EN077

Latex Allergy Card

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More information:

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  • Rubber sink stoppers and sink mats
  • Rubber or rubber-grip utensils
  • Rubber electrical cords or water hoses
  • Bath mats and floor rugs that have rubber backing
  • Toothbrushesย with rubber grips or handles
  • Rubber tub toys
  • Sanitary napkins (that contain rubber)
  • Condoms and diaphragms
  • Diapersย that contain rubber
  • Adult undergarments that contain rubber
  • Waterproof bed pads containing rubber
  • Undergarments, socks, and other clothing with elastic bands that contain rubber
  • Adhesives such as glue, paste, art supplies, glue pens
  • Older Barbie dolls and other dolls that are made of rubber
  • Rubber bands, mouse and keyboard cords, desktop and chair pads, rubber stamps
  • Mouse and wrist pads containing rubber
  • Keyboards and calculators with rubber keys or switches
  • Pens with comfort grip or any rubber coating
  • Remote controllers for TVs or recording devices with rubber grips or keys
  • Camera, telescope, or binocular eyepieces
  • Bathing caps and elastic in bathing suits

Outside the home, latex is also in many items, such as:

  • Grocery store checkout belts
  • Restaurants where workers use latex gloves to prepare food
  • Some balloons
  • Car races that give off tire and rubber particles
  • ATM machine buttons made of rubber

Medical products containing latex include:

  • Tourniquets
  • Blood pressure pads
  • EKG pads
  • Some adhesive bandages
  • Dental devices

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Get more information on this Latex Allergy page.

Cross-contact occurs when an allergen is inadvertently transferred from a food containing an allergen to a food that does not contain the allergen. Cooking does not reduce or eliminate the chances of a person with a food allergy having a reaction to the food eaten. Cross-contact can happen through:

  • Food to food - e.g. nuts on top of a salad (even if taken off)
  • Food to object (cooking surfaces, gloves and cookware)

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